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20131202
20131210
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that leadership and what you remember then. congress had to lead america's foreign policy when it came to the issue of south africa. >> it was a very, very tough time. i got elected two months after ronald reagan vetoed the bill and when i met him at the white house that december, he and i got into a rather loud argument of discussion about why it was wrong. he ultimately relented because the senate would have its way. it was a tough fight. i got involved as a student with the movement and led as a member of the city council during which point mr. mandela found out about it and wrote me a short letter that said thank you so much for your support and in bold letters he said don't give up. i thought that was interesting because we didn't want him to give up. it's a tough way to go and to keep this in context. he was up against quite a bit as were the people of south africa. there were a number of determined people here, black, white, jewish who continued it work on behalf of his freedom. >> senator, we have you on not because you are a senator in the u.s. foreign relations committee, but
. >> i think it's a result of several years now of a foreign policy that seems feckless. i mean you can start with resetting the relationship with russia right at the beginning of the administration. you look at the situation with china. looks hike we're almost involved in a growing confrontation over those islands but also all kinds of trade issues. then in the middle east, things are worse in syria, egypt, things are worse, certainly are worse in iran and in libya. i can't find a place where thens have gotten better since president obama's gotten into office, and i've just spent a lot of time in south america and we're not doing too much better there either. >> i thought it was embarrassing for the united states when president putin played almost the role of dad and rescued us from a military action but on the other hand the whole thing was kind of humiliating. >> the president created that for himself by drawing a red line, seems like seven or eight times that if they used chemical weapons, there were going to be serious consequences. and then he didn't seem to know what to do when a
's the result of several years now of a foreign policy that seems feckless. i mean, you can start with resetting the relationship with russia right at the beginning of the administration. they reset it and it's much worse. you look at situation with china, looks like we are almost involved in a growing confrontation over those islands but also all kinds of trade issues. then the middle east, things that are worse in syria. things are worse in egypt. things are worse in certainly -- are worse in iran and libya. i can't find a place where things have gotten better since president obama has gotten into office. i have just spent a lot of time in south america. we're not doing too much better there, either. >> you know, i thought it was sort of humiliating for the united states in the issue over syria when president putin wrote a letter and sort of big footed president obama and sort of stepped in and played almost the role of dad and said i will take care of this. sort of rescued us from a military action. but, on the other hand, the whole thing was sort of humiliating. >> the president really creat
the northeast. make a's dad is very excited rand u.s. foreign policy for years. [applause] you may be familiar with my dad's work to matt. he ran little league baseball. [applause] i was raised in the southern baptist church across the deep south and he of course was raised as a young marxist in the greater manhattan area. >> thank you very much. how many republicans voted for obama here? >> nobody's going to admit that. >> stand up. stand up. show yourself proudly. [applause] i didn't know anyone did that anymore. >> he used to ask that questions how many democrats and how many republicans? how many republicans voted for obama? me, a change. now they go to know. >> it's interesting because the republicans who voted for obama and the republican party itself there seems to be a lot of confusion and a lot of dissatisfaction and discouragement. you wrote this book for a number of reasons but my question is did you plan the timing of this book? >> yes i did. i'm going to drop this thing right before the republican party shinki in d.c. takes the beer truck strayed over the cliff with a government s
and allowing, at the time, sort of which side of the barricade are you on type of foreign policy and you wonder what is the lesson now, right? what do you takeaway from what frankly where we are, american political culture was slow in many ways. where are we, you know, where are we today. where will we regret in 25 years that we were slow in not being on the right side of an issue or right side of history. >> what nelson mandela has said often when he was dealing with his own internal battles within the black coalition in the government as well as whites which is this idea there was a common purpose for south africa after he was released from south africa and when he came president. that's the kind of lesson that can be shared that transcends south africa in his time. where do countries, where do governments of all branches feel they are in it together and have a common purpose to solve problems, to advance freedom, to advance people from all background. i think that's one of the lessons that he already has given. i think it's amazing that chuck is right, i think he was viewed, mandela was in m
. nobody had overturned a presidential veto on foreign policy in the 20th century. you had 37 and 53 republicans, including richard lugar who is still there. mitch mcconnell who said he was in college during civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from comme
. it was the first override of a presidential veto on a foreign policy issue in the century. and anti-apartheid leaders credit those sanctions and credit the private divestment movement around the united states and around the world with bringing about the pressure and the isolation that was necessary to eventually humble the apartheid regime. to humble the ruling south african government and bring them to the negotiations that eventually freed nelson mandela and brought him into the apartheid system. the fight here to do that was nothing compared to the fight in south africa, but politically, it was a he can of a fight here too. joining us now is former california congressman and former oakland mayor, ron dellums. he was the sponsor of the 1986 antiapartheid act. congressman dellums, nice to see you. thank you very much for being here. >> it's an honor to be here. i'm one of your great fans, my friend. >> well, thank you. tell me what led you to sponsor the antiapartheid act in the 1986? >> a little-known fact in history is that a group of african-american employees of the polaroid co
the significant nature of the shift in american foreign policy that we are seeing laid out before us . i would be honored to recognize my colleague and friend, the gentleman from california, mr. sherman. mr. sherman: i thank the gentleman for yielding. the political pund its are focused on -- pund its, are focused on was this a good deal or a bad deal. we aren't here to give a grade to the administration. we are here in congress to decide what legislation should be passed. congress is a policy-making body, although so often those in the administration think that we are, at most, advisers or critics. but let's take a look at this deal and we'll see that what we get out of it is at least overstated by its proponents. because we are told that this halts their enrichment of uranium. it is true that it limits their 20% uranium. and iran will not be making progress during the six-month period of this deal toward its first bomb. but they will be making very substantial progress toward their eighth, ninth and tenth bomb and iran is not a nuclear power until they have some to hide, one to two to test.
income in equality at 11:15. he will be talking about immigration he has foreign policy and heads up to hawaii at the end of the month. the president has a ton going on t. supporters think there is good news, maybe the website is steadying now want more of the president every day. >> obviously, the republicans will not let up despite they may be setting up politicos. mike, thanks, so much. >> have a good day, will. >> coming up, jacoby els berry to the yankees. where does that leave robinson cano who wants serious cash. we have possible suitors in sports. [ music playing ] . >> well, the little engine that could keeps chugging along the bronx. >> i don't know how they do it. >> jacoby elsberry leaving fenway, elsberry reportedly agreed to a seven year $153 million year, an option for an eighth year. the speedy fielder giving a good glove. elsbury had batted .298 last year. he's missed a lot of games. the yankees scheduled to introduce their other beg signing, brian mccann, the catcher. tomorrow. elsbury could joan him if he passes that physical. >> it will be good for the yankees. tv
of one of obama's hidden foreign policy initiatives over the past five years. he is had secret negotiations me, the israelis, excuse with the radians, and we have seen him at the same time alienate many of our allies in the media it's -- in the mideast. doesn't this act is a clever ploy to keep the israelis from attacking and defending their own national interest -- >> the secret meetings with iranians, where'd you get that from? caller: that was in the press this past week. nott: the meetings have .een anything but on the p5+1 what you're talking about now is making sure and verifying, the whole idea was for iran to not having nuclear weapons. if we had gone in this manner before with iraq, where we railroad -- were able to go and massy no weapons of instruction there, let defectors go where they want unfettered, then maybe we would have been able to avoid the thousands of , thecan lives that we lost devastation to our economy that we had. cy as go, give diplomas chance. if in fact around does not live up to the agreement, we have 20 of time and the ability to do -- toings, to
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10